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Childhood cervical lymphadenitis: A reappraisal

  • Leslie L. Barton
    Correspondence
    Reprint address: St. Louis Children's Hospital, 500 S. Kingshighway, St. Louis, Mo 63110.
    Affiliations
    Edward Mallinckrodt Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine St. Louis, Mo. USA

    Division of Infectious Diseases, St. Louis Children's Hospital St. Louis, Mo. USA
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  • Author Footnotes
    ** Dr. Feigin is the recipient of a United States Public Health Service Research Career Development Award No. 1K04A146206 from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
    Ralph D. Feigin
    Footnotes
    ** Dr. Feigin is the recipient of a United States Public Health Service Research Career Development Award No. 1K04A146206 from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
    Affiliations
    Edward Mallinckrodt Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine St. Louis, Mo. USA

    Division of Infectious Diseases, St. Louis Children's Hospital St. Louis, Mo. USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    ** Dr. Feigin is the recipient of a United States Public Health Service Research Career Development Award No. 1K04A146206 from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
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      Seventy-four children with cervical lymphadenopathy were evaluated between January, 1972 and January, 1973. Lymphadenitis was atributed to Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci in 26 per cent of the patients, to Staphylococcus aureus (mainly penicillin-resistant) in 36 per cent, to both staphylococci and streptococci in three per cent, and to peptostreptococci in five per cent. One patient each had lymphadenitis caused by Mycobacterium scrofulaceum, Francisella tularensis, pseudomonas, and a fastidious gram-negative rod. In 24 per cent of the children no etiologic agent could be identified. The minimal diagnostic evaluation of cervical lymphadenopathy should include intradermal mycobacterial skin tests and bacterial cultures of the throat, impetiginous lesions, and lymph node aspirates. Aspirated material should be cultured aerobically and anaerobically.
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