Advertisement

Metabolism of tritiated vitamin D3 in familial vitamin D-resistant rickets with hypophosphatemia

  • Hector F. DeLuca
    Affiliations
    Department of Biochemistry, College of Agriculture, Madison, Wis, USA

    Department of Pediatrics, Medical School of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Judith Lund
    Affiliations
    Department of Biochemistry, College of Agriculture, Madison, Wis, USA

    Department of Pediatrics, Medical School of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Arlan Rosenbloom
    Affiliations
    Department of Biochemistry, College of Agriculture, Madison, Wis, USA

    Department of Pediatrics, Medical School of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    * Address, Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin Medical School, 1300 University Ave., Madison, Wis. 53706.
    Charles C. Lobeck
    Footnotes
    * Address, Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin Medical School, 1300 University Ave., Madison, Wis. 53706.
    Affiliations
    Department of Biochemistry, College of Agriculture, Madison, Wis, USA

    Department of Pediatrics, Medical School of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    * Address, Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin Medical School, 1300 University Ave., Madison, Wis. 53706.
      This paper is only available as a PDF. To read, Please Download here.
      The metabolism of tritiated vitamin D3 in two control subjects and two with familial vitamin D-resistant rickets was studied. Sixteen hours after a 0.25 mg. intravenous dose of H3 vitamin D3 was given, blood samples were taken, extracted, and chromatographed. Both control and rachitic subjects produced in similar amounts a major, polar, biologically active metabolite previously discovered in rats. They also produced another minor chloroform soluble metabolite and aqueous soluble metabolites. Rachitic subjects retained about 60 per cent of the administered dose in blood after 16 hours, while controls retained only 20 per cent. The rachitic subjects had about 20 times more aqueous soluble metabolites in their blood than did the normal ones.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic and Personal
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to The Journal of Pediatrics
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Zull J.E.
        • Czarnowska-Misztal E.
        • DeLuca H.F.
        On the relationship between vitamin D action and actinomycin-sensitive processes.
        Proc. Nat. Acad. Sc. 1966; 55: 177
      1. Lund, J. E., and DeLuca, H. F.: A biologically active metabolite of vitamin D3 from bone, liver, and intestine, J. Lipid Res. In press.

        • Williams T.F.
        • Winters R.W.
        • Burnett C.H.
        Familial (hereditary) vitamin D-resistant rickets with hypophosphatemia.
        in: Stanbury J.B. Wyngaarden J.B. Fredrickson D.S. The metabolic basis of inherited disease. ed. 2. McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., New York1966: 1179-1204
        • Winters R.W.
        • Graham J.B.
        • Williams T.T.
        • McFalls V.W.
        • Burnett C.H.
        A genetic study of familial hypophosphatemia and vitamin D resistant rickets with a review of the literature.
        Medicine. 1958; 37: 97
        • Norman A.W.
        • DeLuca H.F.
        The preparation of H3 vitamins D2 and D3 and their localization in the rat.
        Biochemistry. 1963; 2: 1160
        • Neville P.F.
        • DeLuca H.F.
        The synthesis of (1, 23H) vitamin D3 and the tissue localization of a 0.25 μg (10 I.U.) dose per rat.
        Biochemistry. 1966; 5: 2201
        • Bligh E.G.
        • Dyer W.S.
        A rapid method of total lipid extraction and purification.
        Canad. J. Biochem. & Physiol. 1959; 37: 911
        • Norman A.W.
        • Lund J.
        • DeLuca H.F.
        Biologically active forms of vitamin D3 from kidney and intestine.
        Arch. Biochem. & Biophys. 1964; 108: 12
        • Steenbock H.
        • Black A.
        Fat soluble vitamins. XXIII. The induction of growth-promoting and calcifying properties in fats and their unsaponifiable constituents by exposure to light.
        J. Biol. Chem. 1925; 64: 263
        • DeLuca H.F.
        • Guroff G.
        • Steenbock H.
        • Reiser S.
        • Manatt M.R.
        Effect of various vitamin deficiencies on citric acid metabolism in the rat.
        J. Nutrition. 1961; 75: 175
      2. United States Pharmacopeia. Mack Publishing Company, Easton, Pa.1955
        • Bray G.W.
        A simple efficient liquid scintillator for counting aqueous solutions in a liquid scintillation counter.
        Analyt. Biochem. 1960; 1: 270
      3. Lund, J., Horsting, M., and DeLuca, H. F.: The formation of vitamin D esters in vivo. Submitted for publication.