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Cerebral arachnoid cysts in infants

  • Author Footnotes
    * Address: 1930 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.
    Frank M. Anderson
    Footnotes
    * Address: 1930 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.
    Affiliations
    Division of Neurosurgery, Children's Hospital, Los Angeles, Calif. USA

    Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital, Los Angeles, Calif. USA

    University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, Calif. USA
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  • Benjamin H. Landing
    Affiliations
    Division of Neurosurgery, Children's Hospital, Los Angeles, Calif. USA

    Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital, Los Angeles, Calif. USA

    University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, Calif. USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    * Address: 1930 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.
      This paper is only available as a PDF. To read, Please Download here.
      Nine patients with intracranial supratentorial arachnoid cyst are reviewed. The large cystic lesions compressed and indented the underlying cerebrum, and caused expansion of the overlying cranial vault. Their presence was suggested by physical examination in four children, and all nine were demonstrable radiologically. Cerebral arachnoid cysts have thin translucent walls and clear or pale yellow watery contents resembling cerebrospinal fluid. Clinical manifestations in the younger patients included poor feeding, excessive growth of the skull, and tense fontanels, a picture suggestive of hydrocephalus. Air injection studies showed extracerebral cysts having no demonstrable communication with cerebrospinal fluid pathways. Surgical treatment (resection, cystoventriculostomy, or shunting procedures) resulted in improvement in seven patients.
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