The “Lead Diet”: Can Dietary Approaches Prevent or Treat Lead Exposure?

  • Katarzyna Kordas
    Correspondence
    Reprint requests: Katarzyna Kordas, PhD, Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, 270 Farber Hall, Buffalo, NY 14214.
    Affiliations
    Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY
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      See related article, p 218

      Keywords

      Abbreviations:

      BLL ( Blood lead level), CaT1 ( Calcium transport protein 1), CDC ( Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), DMT1 ( Divalent metal transporter 1), RCT ( Randomized controlled trials)

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