Studies of salt excretion in sweat

Relationships between rate, conductivity, and electrolyte composition of sweat from patients with cystic fibrosis and from control subjects
  • Author Footnotes
    * Present address, 5205 Roland Avenue, Baltimore 10, Md.
    Lewis E. Gibson
    Footnotes
    * Present address, 5205 Roland Avenue, Baltimore 10, Md.
    Affiliations
    Pediatric Metabolism Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. USA
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  • Author Footnotes
    ** Address, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda 14, Md.
    Paul A. di Sant'Agnese
    Footnotes
    ** Address, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda 14, Md.
    Affiliations
    Pediatric Metabolism Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    * Present address, 5205 Roland Avenue, Baltimore 10, Md.
    ** Address, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda 14, Md.
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      A device is described with which it is possible to measure the rate of sweating and the conductivity of sweat simultaneously. Interestingly, it was found that the sweat glands in patients with cystic fibrosis of the pancreas behave like those in normal individuals in that the concentration of electrolytes (as measured by the conductivity) is greater at rapid rates of sweating than at slow rates. However, the range of values in fibrocystic patients is so much higher than in controls as to not affect the diagnostic value of the sweat test. As interpreted, the data indicate that the precursor solution in patients with cystic fibrosis has a higher concentration of electrolytes than that in normal individuals. The rate of tubular salt absorption is approximately the same in patients with cystic fibrosis and in normal individuals.
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